How Kedarnath temple braved nature's fury

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Updated: Friday, June 28, 2013, 16:44 [IST]
 

Dehradun, June 27:The evacuation and the rescue operations in Uttarakhand are almost done and now begins the Himalayan operation of resurrection and rehabilitation. Officials said that it would take around 3-4 years to get the town back on its feet.

However, amidst the scene of destruction and mayhem, there is one structure that stands tall, perfectly in shape, with minor cracks here and there. This is the Kedarnath temple, which has miraculously braved the flash floods when the entire vicinity was turning into rumbles. Call it the miracle of being the God's own abode or sheer luck, the temple stands unscathed.

However, scientists believe otherwise. They believe that it is the sheer structure of the building that holds the mystery as it was under the snow for almost 400 years and still survived.

Scientists further confirm that the temple structure has several yellow lines that implies glacial movement over the stones. Glaciers comprise of mud and rocks and can be really abrasive. "But the structure remained steady with just a few yellow lines here and there," said one of the scientists in Wadia Institute of Geology. "Even the interiors of the temple show such marks, but the stones are more polished," he added.

There are many theories regarding the construction of the temple. While some say that it was built by Raja Bhoj of Malwa, who reigned between 1076 and 1099 AD, while there are others who believe that it was the Pandavas who built a temple behind the Kedarnath in the Hindu Dwapar era. But the popular belief is that it was built by Adi Shankaracharya in the 8th century. That proves the fact because the LIttle Ice Age is considered to have taken place between 1300-1900 AD when the temple became a part of the glacier.

The scientists have conducted a Lichenometric dating test on the stones to know their age. The test proves that the glacial formation in the area started in the middle of the 14th century and continued till 1748. It is believed that the Kedarnath is a part of the Chorabari glacier and had five rivers flowing through iMandakini, Madhuganga, Chhirganga, Saraswati and Swarndari. While the other rivers are mythicsl, Mandakhini is said to grow by magnificent extent when it rains or snows.

The temple is 85 feet high, 187 feet long and 80 feet wide. The walls are 12 feet thick and built of very strong stones. The platform on which the temple stands is six foot high.

Clearly, the engineers of the temple had kept the terrains and the formation of the glaciers and the snow in mind and built the temple to withstand any kind of natural disaster. Or could it be the power of the deity that it is dedicated to? Lord Shiva is the destroyer and the saviour, so the temple had to brave all odds to symbolise the omnipresent Shiva.

In Gauchar

Uttarakhand State officials giving financial help to rescued pilgrims from Kedarnath at Gauchar on Wednesday.

In Kedarnath

Sadhu waits to board an IAF helicopter near Kedarnath Temple on Tuesday.

In Kedarnath

Sadhu waits to board an IAF helicopter near Kedarnath Temple on Tuesday.

In Kedarnath

Rescued pilgrims wait for helicopter in Kedarnath on Tuesday.

In Kedarnath

A view of flood-ravaged Kedarnath Temple and other devastated building near it on Tuesday.

In Dehradun

Rescued pilgrim from Kedarnath being taken to hospital at Jolly grant airport, Dehradun in Uttarakhand on Saturday.

In Kedarnath

Bodies of flood hit pilgrims lying near Kedarnath shrine, one of the holiest of Hindu temples dedicated to Lord Shiva, after heavy rains in Uttarakhand on Thursday.

In Kedarnath

Kedarnath shrine, one of the holiest of Hindu temples dedicated to Lord Shiva, and other buildings around it are seen damaged after heavy rains in Uttarakhand on Thursday.

In Kedarnath

Kedarnath shrine, one of the holiest of Hindu temples dedicated to Lord Shiva, and other buildings are seen damaged on Thursday following heavy rains and flood in Uttarakhand.

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